Lamentations of the Whispering Tyrant

For a long time now, my two main interests in role-playing have been Old School games (mainly Lamentations of the Flame Princess), and “new school” fantasy role-playing (D&D 3.5 and Pathfinder RPG). I’ve participated in over 50 game sessions of each in the past few years, and have more than a passing familiarity with both game systems and play-styles. Both of these games have their roots in Dungeons & Dragons, but are nevertheless fundamentally different on almost every level. The only thing they seem to have in common is that both claim to be D&D, and both are fantasy role-playing games.

Each of these games provide something the other does not. Old school gives me easy, flexible rules, a free-form type of play, an emphasis on player skill and ingenuity, and a focus on exploration and investigation. New school gives me a robust game system, that appeals to the gamist in me, and a wealth of enticing campaign world and story material.

And so, after some brainstorming and research, I’ve decided to try and combine elements of both games into one campaign. The new campaign is going to be called Ustalav. It uses the LotFP rules, and old school sensibilities in play-style. Pathfinder RPG provides the story fodder in the form of the Carrion Crown Adventure Path, a new school mega-adventure about the gothic horror -themed nation of Ustalav in Paizo’s campaign world Golarion. The adventure path spans six books, for a total of around 300 pages of gaming material. Considering the relatively slow pace of old school campaigns, this campaign has the potential to last years.

Lets see how it turns out shall we.

Edit: An earlier post I wrote has relevance the topic of this one. For anyone interested in the topic, it might be worth checking out: D&D 3.5 Mega-Adventures Old School Style.

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The Red Corsairs Mk. II

I’ve recently been tinkering with my army list, trying to find something new and interesting to play with. I’ve also played some test games, and gotten some new models painted. In a previous post I bemoaned the fact, that most viable lists are variations of the same list. To a point this is still true, but I think I’ve managed to find a combination that at least manages to provide me with a slightly different gaming experience. And here it is: The Red Corsairs Mk. II, now with added BOOM!

Red Corsairs Chaos Space Marines 1750 pts.

HQ
King Hell (Chaos Sorcerer)
Mark of Slaanesh, Lash of Submission

Voormas the Violator (Chaos Sorcerer)
Mark of Slaanesh, Lash of Submission

Elites
Barakka’s Blood Reavers (3 Chaos Terminators)
Reaper Autocannon & Chainfist, 2x Combi-Melta & Power Weapon

The Kraken (Chaos Land Raider)
Dozer Blade

Troops
Murat’s Crew (5 Chaos Space Marines)
Melta Gun, Icon of Chaos Glory, Rhino

Barbossa’s Crew (5 Chaos Space Marines)
Melta Gun, Icon of Chaos Glory, Rhino

Jagha’s Crew (10 Chaos Space Marines)
2x Melta Gun, Icon of Chaos Glory

Typhon’s Crew (5 Plague Marines)
2x Plasmagun, Rhino

Heavy Support
Black Bess (Chaos Vindicator)
Daemonic Possession

Scylla (Chaos Vindicator)
Daemonic Possession

Beasts of the Deep (3 Obliterators)

The Sorcerers go with the five man squads into the Rhinos. Now that Lash isn’t a shooting attack anymore, the Sorcerer can lash out of a Rhino that has moved full tilt and popped its smoke launchers, which should provide targets for all that heavy artillery. The Land Raider deploys empty, and the ten man squad goes in there. The Terminators can either deep strike or start on the field, hammering away at all those soft Rhino and Chimera hulls.

The main difference between this list and the previous one is that there is more firepower, but it is generally shorter range, so the Rhinos with the Sorcerers need move up fast, and start bunching together targets for the 24″ range Vindicators, who also need to get a move on fast. The Obliterators and the Land Raider can hang back, since their range is a lot better. The squad in the Land Raider is there for taking objectives, so don’t stay too far back for too long. The army as a whole isn’t fast, so objectives on the opponent’s side of the field must be kept in mind from turn one.

I’ve played two games with this army now, both Annihilations, and both decisive victories. Methinks I need to test my mettle against more capable generals next…